ART OF AMENDING DRAFT RESOLUTION

Approved draft resolutions are modified through amendments. An amendment is a written statement that adds, deletes or changes an operative clause in a draft resolution. The amendment process is used to strengthen consensus on a resolution by allowing delegates to change the operative clauses (the pre-ambulatory clauses can not be modified).

There are two types of amendments:

1. A friendly amendment is a change to the draft resolution that all sponsors agree with. After the amendment is signed by all of the draft resolution’s sponsors and approved by the committee chair, it will be automatically incorporated into the resolution.

2. An unfriendly amendment is a change that some or all of the draft resolution’s sponsors do not support and must be voted upon by the committee. This also refers to delegates who did not write this resolution at all but see potential in it as long as several changes are made to it. The sponsors of the amendment will need to obtain a required number of signatories in order to introduce it. Prior to voting on the draft resolution, the committee votes on all unfriendly amendments.

Writing an amendment is very simple.

All you have to do is make an operative clause that adds, deletes, or changes an operative clause in a draft resolution. Examples include:

  • Adds an operative clause that reads “14. Encourages all Latin American countries to…”

  • Deletes operative clause 9.

  • Changes operative clause 1 to read “1. Calls upon the Red Cross to provide low-cost medicines…”